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Developmental Milestones

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Milestones for Prader-Willi syndrome are not the same for every child, but below are the typical milestones with PWS. This information is from the Management of Prader-Willi Syndrome ~ Third Edition in chapter one, Clinical Findings and Natural History of Prader-Willi Syndrome (by Merlin Butler, Jeanne Hanchett, and Travis Thompson) on Page 11. This textbook is available from PWSA (USA) click here for details.

The first few years of life

  • Failure-to –thrive is noted in infancy, including hypotonia (weak muscle tone) a weak cry and a poor suck. This is usually the first indication for a diagnosis of Prader-Willi syndrome. The hypotonia typically begins to improve between 8 and 11 months of age.
  • Sitting up usually occurs at 11-12 months of age.
  • Crawling typically begins at 15-16 months of age.
  • Walking begins 24-27 months of age.
  • Talking (10 words) at ages 38-39 months.

The delay in achieving motor milestones appears to relate more to psychomotor development than to excessive obesity (or intellect). Language appears to be the most delayed of the developmental milestones.

Note:  The developmental data are for non-GH treated subjects

  Last edited 09/07/2010